Sports massage has antecedents in earlier periods of history. The ancient Greeks and Romans combined massage and exercise in their athletic training. Various Asian cultures also developed forms of massage for dancers and for students of martial arts . As a formal practice, however, sports massage began in the Soviet Union and Communist bloc countries in the 1960s. Soviet teams were the first to have a massage therapist travel with them and work on their athletes on a regular and ongoing basis. Through sports and cultural exchanges, the concept of sports massage moved to Europe and the United States in the 1970s. Over time the benefits of sports massage became accepted, and sports massage became a part of the training regimen, first of professional athletes, then of college and amateur athletes. Today sports massage is recognized as a specialty by the American Massage Therapy Association.

Addressing anything from headaches to sinus problems to stomach issues, if sensitivity or tenderness is experienced when certain areas of the foot are stimulated, it usually indicates bodily weaknesses or imbalances within the corresponding organ. With repeated practice of applying pressure and manipulating nerve endings (traditionally in the foot), reflexology can help to clear any channels of blocked energy through moving the flow of blood, nutrients and nerve impulses to ultimately improve overall health and balance. In addition to manipulating the pressure points on the foot, reflexologists sometimes work on the hands or ears to trigger relaxation as well.
Swedish massage is given to increase blood circulation, easing the tension in the body’s muscles and improving the muscles’ flexibility. It stimulates the skin as well as the nervous system to soothe the nerves, reducing both emotional and physical stress. In fact the massage is a staple in most stress management programs. A Swedish massage is given to help with increasing the flow of oxygen in the blood, releasing toxins from the body’s muscles flushing the lactic acids, uric acids, and other type of metabolic wastes out of the body tissues. It can really shorten the recovery time for a muscular strain!!

Shannon Floyd 30172 Georgia GA 34.3333 -85.2337


The pressure from Swedish massage is ideal for relieving muscle tension, like the kind that builds up from hunching over a computer all day. This tension can sometimes result in knots: trigger points of extremely tense muscle fibers that form tiny nodules. Massage therapists are trained to feel for these knots, and Swedish-massage techniques are ideal for gently coaxing them away.

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Scarring is a natural part of your body’s healing process. While most people know that scars are formed on the skin when a wound heals, scar formation can also occur internally after a muscle or ligament injury. Deep tissue massage can help break down internal and external scar tissue and help in muscle recovery. Some of the studies conducted to find out the effect of massage on scar tissue have reported good results.10 A study on patients with burn scars found that massage treatment resulted in less pain and itching, and a significant decrease in scar thickness.11

Because the deep tissue massage is used for stiffness, knots, chronic pain, contracted areas, and muscle tightness, your massage therapist will apply pressure and use deep strokes in order to get everything feeling back to normal again. Deep pressure is used to break apart your painful, stubborn knots. Knots can be described as a group of rigid tissue.


Swedish massage was invented by a Swedish fencing instructor named Per Henrik Ling in the 1830s. When he was injured in the elbows, he reportedly cured himself using tapping (percussion) strokes around the affected area. He later developed the technique currently known as Swedish massage. This technique was brought to the United States from Sweden by two brothers, Dr. Charles and Dr. George Taylor in the 1850s. The specific techniques used in Swedish massage involve the application of long gliding strokes, friction, and kneading and tapping movements on the soft tissues of the body. Sometimes passive or active joint movements are also used.

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Previous research has showed that reflexology can reduce the peripheral neuropathy of a patient who suffers from type 2 diabetes mellitus.31 76 patients ranged from 40–79 years old were listed from public health centres in Busan City. Tactile response to monofilament and intensity of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy were used as the variable outcomes in this study. Tingling sensation and pain were reduced and tactile was more sensitive to 10 g force monofilament.32 The author added that the reflexology can be used as one of the interventions for encouraging foot care in patients who have diabetes mellitus.32 It also can be measured based on glycaemic control and nerve conductivity which show improvement with reflexology.31
Deep tissue and trigger point massages are very similar. The difference is that deep tissue massage uses various traditional massage techniques to work the tissue, whereas trigger point massage is literally looking to manipulate or press on that one point that relieves tension in an entire area (perhaps not even nearby). For both, consider this contraption, which is an invaluable tool for torturing soothing sore muscles all over your body. This is a great guide on doing trigger point therapy for yourself.
Emmanuelle is a certified reflexologist, and a member of the Reflexology Association of America (RAA). She has practiced reflexology for five years, including three years in Paris.  She has studied anatomy, physiology and reflexology, and have been certified in two schools: Action Reflexo Formation (www.action-reflexo.com) with a Traditional Chinese Medicine approach focused on the systemic relation between organs, and is also certified in Reflex Therapy Total Faure Alderson, Ingham Method, focused on the cranial-sacral balance. She participates in post-graduate trainings to enhance her practice.  She practices reflexology with specific processes of manual pressure on feet areas. These areas include  7,200  nervous points located on your feet. The pressure points activate the general nervous network of your body connected through these points and areas. The process will stimulate healing and have a balancing effect on the systems, including the digestive system, hormonal system, cardio-vascular system, and lymphatic system.  Reflexology can address many imbalances, like sleeping problems, stress, puberty, menopause, weight and digestive problems, and recovery after surgery.  In addition to a deep functional relaxation and release of the tensions, the process will promote long-term health.

Speaking of matching, our service path, The Elements Way®, means that Elements Massage™ studios will match each of you with the massage therapist that can best deliver a great massage based on the needs and requests you provide. During the session, each therapist will check in with each of you to make sure the massage session is exactly what you want.


Certainly a well presented and premier technical DVD series on an approach to deep tissue massage and myofascial release. Well formatted and presented. Good on technique and for both patient and therapist positioning. Should be considered as part of any clinical library. Myofascial massage and release is often of underestimated value in patient's plan of care. The DVDs aim at demonstration of technique and do so in a comprehensive and clear manner. The series is not intended to present current scientific evidence.

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