In ashiatsu, the practitioner uses their feet to deliver treatment. The name comes from the Japanese, ashi for foot and atsu for pressure.[34] This technique typically uses the heel, sesamoid, arch and/or whole plantar surface of foot, and offers large compression, tension and shear forces with less pressure than an elbow, and is ideal for large muscles, such as in thigh, or for long-duration upper trapezius compressions.[35] Other manual therapy techniques using the feet to provide treatment include Keralite, Barefoot Lomi Lomi, Chavutti Thirumal.


"The entire visit from reception to walking out is enjoyable. The staff is friendly and knowledgeable. Each massage is better than the last which seems impossible. Everyone acts as a team unit and are all on the same page. The therapist always ask how you are feeling and if there is anything you’d like to focus on. It is ALWAYS a full 60 minutes of hands on and certainly not a fluff massage. Dr Julia is amazing and the fact that they run chiro and massage under your insurance benefits is just the cherry on top! You won’t be disappointed at the Wellness Center!"
Before a session begins, the client will typically be led to the treatment room and asked to remove their clothes and lie down under a sheet or blanket on the massage table. In most cases, and based on comfort level, it is up to the client to determine whether to leave undergarments on. Clients will generally be covered with a sheet for the majority of the session. Those who have privacy concerns may wish to discuss these with the massage therapist before the session begins.
While this massage is designed to help ease the pain, you might experience discomfort during your appointment, especially when your therapist is applying pressure to a problem area. It is best to speak up and let your therapist know if the discomfort becomes painful; even though the Deep Tissue massage is meant to apply more pressure, pain does not mean that the massage is working. You might also experience some soreness and stiffness; this is perfectly normal and should subside within 24 hours. ElementsMassage.com recommends that you drink a lot of water in order to flush out the lactic acid that will have accumulated in the tissues; this may ease some of the soreness. Bruising after your massage may also occur; keep in mind that your therapist was applying more pressure in order to reach your troubled areas, light bruising is normal. Cathy Wong also points out that “case reports have reported venous thromboembolism, spinal accessory neuropathy, hepatic hematoma, and posterior interosseous syndrome after deep tissue massage.”

Avondale Estates DeKalb 30002 Georgia GA 33.7717 -84.2607

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